Busy in wonder: Who Knows, Maybe I’ll See The Glass Half full…

Insight, philosophy, thoughts, Uncategorized

If only for myself I write these thoughts, I’ll write yet more, to satisfy my own yearn for expression, my own desire to be heard, to matter, to be greater than the some of my parts. I know that my mirror reflects a man greater than it’s shown, a man with potential untapped and projections uncapped. I see a man of honour, I see a man of trust and wisdom. A man who’s allowed experience to guide him but knowledge to shape him. I see him stand, I see him speak, compassionate and firm, a glaring light.

Yet still most days I wonder. Most days I’m aware of who I am, who I was and who I would like to be – and I wonder, had my previous self been a little more free, free to think free to read, free to learn, free to be; and he had stood before that mirror would he see what I now see? And if that be true, then had time been wasted? Maybe. Or maybe it’s the experience that allows context to be applied to new knowledge. Maybe it’s the pain, maybe it’s the memories, maybe it’s the thoughts that only I can access, in the darkest corners of pneuma that even allow such a reflection to be possible.

These moments lead me to think that my vision isn’t in-spite of experience, but tethered to memory of all ilk. What I mean is that hope is a result of understanding ones experience and supplementing that with knowledge. I’m saying that growth in and of itself is doomed vanity hunt. For I could educate myself one thousand times over, make all the right decisions on paper and still not be a better Asya.

Hope is my wonder and I’ll be forever busy…

Brexit, the issue of our generation, just the word itself is polarising. The mere mention of being Pro Brexit is likely to see you littered with streams of abuse, referring to you as a Xenophobe or more despicably, an idiot. The prevailing idea of our β€˜Liberal’ establishment is one of greater globalisation, the erosion of the nation state and the implementation of super state like structures used to subjugate the working class.

To understand how Brexit can help the working people’s, you must first understand how globalisation and neoliberalism have. Globalisation refers to the contraction of the world, at least at a metaphorical level. Take the EU’s freedom of movement of β€˜goods, capital, services and labour’ an issue that has been disingenuously adopted by some right wing figures who care little for the real impact of such policies on ordinary people.

The idea that this freedom of movement is of benefit to workers is laughable. The labour movements power has always been drawn from the power of workers, the populace majority, to withdraw/withhold their labour as a negotiating tactic. The freedom of movement of labour has completely killed this tactic. Quite simply, for employers having a greater stream of potential workers ensures that you have no real incentive to consider the real life impact of your decisions on your employees.

A look at a GDP map of Europe from 2012 shows the clear difference in a he economic state of Western Europe when compared to Eastern Europe. This is a result of plenty of differing factors, that would require another article if I were to even try and explain. However in short, what is clear is that the economies of Western and Eastern European countries are vastly different. As such greater European political integration has benefited the East much more so than the West.

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There are currently around 1.4 million Eastern Europeans living in the United Kingdom, totalling more than the 1.3 million brits who are spread across the continent. Fundamentally what you have is a shortage of labour in Eastern Europe and an abundance of labour in the West. But who benefits from this?

Well the working class Western Europeans do not, that’s for certain. More workers means more competition for said workers, but not only for jobs, for housing, healthcare, school places for their children etc. But do the Eastern Europeans benefit from this? Well the answer is yes and no. First generation immigrants undeniably benefit from the higher standard of living, but what about their children who is then become part of the future abundance of labour? Freedom of movement allows for corporations to recycle labour throughout Europe and as such destroys the value of labour.

Insight, thoughts, Uncategorized